Author Profile

Aileen K Ho

Affiliation: University of Reading, School of Psychology, 3 Earley Gate, WhiteKnights Road, Reading, RG6 6AL

Recent Posts

Assessment of Day-to-Day Functioning in Prodromal and Early Huntington Disease

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The Functional Rating Scale Taskforce for pre-Huntington Disease (FuRST-pHD) is a multinational, multidisciplinary initiative with the goal of developing a data-driven, comprehensive, psychometrically sound, rating scale for assessing symptoms and functional ability in prodromal and early Huntington disease (HD) gene expansion carriers. The process involves input from numerous sources to identify relevant symptom domains, including HD individuals, caregivers, and experts from a variety of fields, as well as knowledge gained from the analysis of data from ongoing large-scale studies in HD using existing clinical scales. This is an iterative process in which an ongoing series of field tests in prodromal (prHD) and early HD individuals provides the team with data on which to make decisions regarding which questions should undergo further development or testing and which should be excluded. We report here the development and assessment of the first iteration of interview questions aimed to assess functional impact in day-to-day activities in prHD and early HD individuals.

Assessment of Cognitive Symptoms in Prodromal and Early Huntington Disease

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The Functional Rating Scale Taskforce for pre-Huntington Disease (FuRST-pHD) is a multinational, multidisciplinary initiative with the goal of developing a data-driven, comprehensive, psychometrically sound, rating scale for assessing symptoms and functional ability in prodromal and early Huntington disease (HD) gene expansion carriers. The process involves input from numerous sources to identify relevant symptom domains, including HD individuals, caregivers, and experts from a variety of fields, as well as knowledge gained from the analysis of data from ongoing large-scale studies in HD using existing clinical scales. This is an iterative process in which an ongoing series of field tests in prodromal (prHD) and early HD individuals provides the team with data on which to make decisions regarding which questions should undergo further development or testing and which should be excluded. We report here the development and assessment of the first iteration of interview questions aimed to assess cognitive symptoms in prHD and early HD individuals.

Assessment of Motor Symptoms and Functional Impact in Prodromal and Early Huntington Disease

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The Functional Rating Scale Taskforce for pre-Huntington Disease (FuRST-pHD) is a multinational, multidisciplinary initiative with the goal of developing a data-driven, comprehensive, psychometrically sound, rating scale for assessing symptoms and functional ability in prodromal and early Huntington disease (HD) gene expansion carriers. The process involves input from numerous sources to identify relevant symptom domains, including HD individuals, caregivers, and experts from a variety of fields, as well as knowledge gained from the analysis of data from ongoing large-scale studies in HD using existing clinical scales. This is an iterative process in which an ongoing series of field tests in prodromal (prHD) and early HD individuals provides the team with data on which to make decisions regarding which questions should undergo further development or testing and which should be excluded. We report here the development and assessment of the first iteration of interview questions aimed to assess functional impact of motor manifestations in prHD and early HD individuals.

Assessing Behavioural Manifestations Prior to Clinical Diagnosis of Huntington Disease: “Anger and Irritability” and “Obsessions and Compulsions”

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The Functional Rating Scale Taskforce for pre-Huntington Disease (FuRST-pHD) is a multinational, multidisciplinary initiative with the goal of developing a data-driven, comprehensive, psychometrically sound, rating scale for assessing symptoms and functional ability in prodromal and early Huntington disease (HD) gene expansion carriers. The process involves input from numerous sources to identify relevant symptom domains, including HD individuals, caregivers, and experts from a variety of fields, as well as knowledge gained from the analysis of data from ongoing large-scale studies in HD using existing clinical scales. This is an iterative process in which an ongoing series of field tests in prodromal (prHD) and early HD individuals provides the team with data on which to make decisions regarding which questions should undergo further development or testing and which should be excluded. We report here the development and assessment of the first iteration of interview questions aimed to assess “Anger and Irritability” and “Obsessions and Compulsions” in prHD individuals.

Assessment of Depression, Anxiety and Apathy in Prodromal and Early Huntington Disease

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The Functional Rating Scale Taskforce for pre-Huntington Disease (FuRST-pHD) is a multinational, multidisciplinary initiative with the goal of developing a data-driven, comprehensive, psychometrically sound, rating scale for assessing symptoms and functional ability in prodromal and early Huntington disease (HD) gene expansion carriers. The process involves input from numerous sources to identify relevant symptom domains, including HD individuals, caregivers, and experts from a variety of fields, as well as knowledge gained from the analysis of data from ongoing large-scale studies in HD using existing clinical scales. This is an iterative process in which an ongoing series of field tests in prodromal (prHD) and early HD individuals provides the team with data on which to make decisions regarding which questions should undergo further development or testing and which should be excluded. We report here the development and assessment of the first iteration of interview questions aimed to assess Depression, Anxiety and Apathy in prHD and early HD individuals.

Observing Huntington’s Disease: the European Huntington’s Disease Network’s REGISTRY

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Background: Huntington’s disease (HD) is a rare triplet repeat (CAG) disorder. Advanced, multi-centre, multi-national research frameworks are needed to study simultaneously multiple complementary aspects of HD. This includes the natural history of HD, its management and the collection of clinical information and biosamples for research.
Methods: We report on cross-sectional data of the first 1766 participants in REGISTRY, the European Huntington’s Disease Network’s (EHDN), multi-lingual, multi-national prospective observational study of HD in Europe. Data collection (demographics, phenotype, genotype, medication, co-morbidities, biosamples) followed a standard protocol.
Results: Phenotype, and the HD genotype, of manifest HD participants across different European regions was similar. Motor onset was most common (48%) with a non-motor onset in more than a third of participants. Motor signs increased, and cognitive abilities and functional capacity declined as the disease burden (CAGn-35.5) X age) increased. A life-time history of behavioural symptoms was common, but the behavioural score was not related to disease burden. One fifth of participants had severe psychiatric problems, e.g. suicidal ideation and attempts, and/or irritability/aggression, with psychosis being less common. Participants on anti-dyskinetic medication had a higher motor and lower cognitive score, were older, and more prone to physical trauma. A higher motor and a lower cognitive score predicted more advanced disease.
Conclusions: The unparalleled collection of clinical data and biomaterials within the EHDN’s REGISTRY can expedite the search for disease modifiers (genetic and environmental) of age at onset and disease progression that could be harnessed for the development of novel treatments.

Cognitive follow up of a small cohort of Huntington’s disease patients over a 5 year period.

A small group of patients with manifest Huntington’s disease (HD) were followed longitudinally to assess cognitive decline in relation to time from disease diagnosis. This article looks at performance on a range of computerised and pencil and paper cognitive tasks in patients 5 years post diagnosis, who were assessed annually for a 5 year follow up period. The almost universal cognitive decline reported in other longitudinal studies of HD was not replicated in this study. It was proposed that longitudinal follow up in HD is complicated by the varying degree to which different tasks are able to withstand repeated administration; a finding which would have significant implications on study design in future trials of cognitive enhansing interventions.